Fall 2020 Online Courses

Fall 2020 Online Courses

Fall semester Applications are Now Closed! RYI will offer more online courses for the spring semester in January 2021.

RYI is happy to announce that the following courses will be offered online this coming fall semester to students who would like to study these courses without the need to commit to the obligations of a degree program. If you are interested in applying for any of our undergraduate degree programs (which will be online for the coming fall and spring semesters) please click here. Otherwise you can apply for any of the courses below by staying on this page. 

All courses consist of live classes with most courses having two class options to choose from in order to accommodate your time zone and lifestyle. Please note that for most of the courses the same classes are scheduled at two different times in any given week, you can choose from either option based on your time preference. In the schedule the distinction between the two options is made by the label "S1" and "S2", and you can choose from either of these options. While RYI has made every effort to accommodate timezones for all classes it may simply not be possible for every class. In this case you can watch the recorded version of the class once the live session is complete which is available soon after class completion. You will find the times of your classes in the course descriptions below.

If you have completed a Summer Program Beginning level or I​ntermediate level language course you are eligible to apply for level III or V of ​that course, respectively.  RYI will offer a continuation of the courses in the spring semester. The courses can be taken for-credit or not-for-credit.

Orientation begins August 26, with classes commencing August 31. The fall semester ends December 18.

Courses Available

Traditional Textual Study

TSTD 101: Buddhist Philosophy and Hermeneutics I

The Bodhicaryāvatāra (Way of the Bodhisattva)

The Bodhicaryāvatāra is a key text of the Mahāyāna tradition that introduces the practices that a bodhisattva takes up as he or she follows the Buddha’s path. The text challenges us to examine our own understanding of terms such as patience, conscientiousness, meditation, and diligence and to reflect on how we apply those in our own lives. What does it mean to be generous? How do we combine insight with patience? What are the benefits of meditation? And how are we to understand Madhyamaka philosophy in both its simplicity and its depth? This is the first of a series of specialized courses in Buddhist philosophy and scriptural interpretation taught by Khenpos and Lopons from Ka-Nying Shedrub Ling monastery and translated into English.  Click here to see more about the course and this semester’s schedule. 

Courses taught by our Khenpos and Lopons will be taught live just once per day, but available worldwide in a pre-recorded format. And that the review classes are live within the two time zones.

TSTD 201: Advanced Buddhist Philosophy and Hermeneutics I

The Gateway to Knowledge (mkhas ‘jug)

The Gateway to Knowledge is Jamgon Mipham Rinpoche’s brilliant synopsis of the extensive Sanskrit-language Abhidharma traditions brought to Tibet by Indian Buddhist scholars. Abhidharma is a rich and thought-provoking philosophical tradition that complements Buddhist meditative practices by offering an analytical framework that describes and clarifies the components of our mental and physical experiences as human beings. Through its breakdown of our experience into individual dharmas, it teaches concepts and terminology that students continue to encounter throughout their studies in different contexts and in surprising places. Topics for this semester include the dharmas that make up our imagined selves: the aggregates, the elements, and the sense sources, plus discussions of dependent origination, time, and the four truths.  Click here to see more about the course and the course schedule.  

Courses taught by our Khenpos and Lopons will be taught live just once per day, but available worldwide in a pre-recorded format. And that the review classes are live within the two time zones.

Classical Tibetan

TLAN 101: Classical Tibetan I

This class is for students who are new to Classical Tibetan and want to get started learning to read Tibetan Buddhist texts. The class covers the principal topics of classical Tibetan grammar and introduces the ordinary and dharma vocabulary needed to read simple sentences. As the course progresses, students learn how to integrate their developing understanding of grammar with their growing vocabulary and are happy to discover they are able to read simple text passages from classical Tibetan Buddhist literature by the end of the course. Click here to see more about the course and the course schedule. You can choose from either class time; "S1" or "S2", depending on your timezone. 

TLAN 201: Classical Tibetan III

This class is for students who have at least two semesters’ study of Classical Tibetan, and focuses on helping students develop familiarity and competency in various genres of Tibetan texts including prayer (smon lam), oral instruction (gdams ngag), and logic (tshad ma). Emphasis is placed on gaining knowledge of terminology and grammar, which is explained in tandem with the students’ presentations of their translations during class sessions.  It’s also important for students to become familiar with the ideas and philosophical principles encountered in the readings: critical for genuine understanding of the texts and for creating accurate translations. Click here to see more about the course and the course schedule. You can choose from either class time; "S1" or "S2", depending on your timezone. 

TLAN 301: Classical Tibetan V (Translation Project I)

This course aims to develop the ability to translate classical literary Tibetan into modern languages, primarily English. In weekly meetings selected readings on translation method and theory are introduced and discussed in relation to the field in general and to the area of Buddhist Studies in particular. Through translating a previously untranslated manuscript, issues of translation method and policy are introduced. 

There are two times available to choose from (S1 or S2) for Colloquial Tibetan V:

TLAN 301 S1 Mon and Wed 7:45 AM - 8:45 AM (Nepal time)

TLAN 301 S2 Tue and Thu 9:15 PM - 10:15 PM (Nepal time)

 

 

Colloquial Tibetan

TLAN 103: Colloquial Tibetan I

This is an entry-level class that introduces students to the basics of spoken Tibetan so they can begin conversing with Tibetans in their own language. Students start by learning basic conversational structures and building a vocabulary of colloquial words and phrases. Emphasis is placed on active learning, with students using techniques such as role-playing, group discussions, and games to develop confidence in speaking. Twice a week, students have individual classes with a native Tibetan speaker who helps them integrate what they’ve learned in class into a real conversation. Click here to see more about the course and the course schedule. You can choose from either class time; "S1" or "S2", depending on your timezone. 

TLAN 203: Colloquial Tibetan III

This class is for students who have at least two semesters’ study of Colloquial Tibetan, and aims to bring students to the point where they can communicate comfortably in Tibetan. New grammatical structures and vocabulary are introduced, enabling students to use more nuanced sentences and to converse on a wider variety of topics. A number of different classroom techniques are employed to help students understand and practice these more complicated sentence structures and to express more complex ideas. The use of honorific language is explained in detail. Twice a week, students have individual classes with a native Tibetan speaker who helps them integrate what they’ve learned in class into a real conversation. Click here to see more about the course and the course schedule. You can choose from either class time; "S1" or "S2", depending on your timezone. 

TLAN 303: Colloquial Tibetan V

The aim of this course is to refine the students’ ability to communicate clearly and correctly in Colloquial Tibetan and to augment their understanding of the language by drawing links between colloquial usages and classical grammar. This course also further emphasizes the correct and natural use of honorific language. The first section of the semester is devoted to reviewing and refining knowledge from previous courses and to teaching a traditional presentation of the grammar of Classical Tibetan as it is related to the colloquial language. 

There are two times available to choose from (S1 or S2) for Colloquial Tibetan V:

TLAN 301 S1 Mon and Wed 7:45am - 8:45am

TLAN 301 S2 Tue and Thu 9:15PM - 10:15pm

 

 

Nepali

NLAN 101: Nepali I

This class is for students who are new to speaking Nepali and want to get started learning to converse with Nepali speakers in their own language. The class introduces students to basic patterns of spoken and written Nepali that center around various situations found in ordinary life, such as travelling, shopping, getting acquainted, family, and social life. Students learn the Devanāgarī script so they can read and write the language directly, and begin building a vocabulary of colloquial words and phrases. Basic grammatical concepts are introduced, illustrated, and then practiced by the students. Emphasis is placed on active learning, with students using techniques such as role-playing, group discussions, and games in order to develop confidence in speaking. Twice a week, students have individual classes with a native Nepali speaker who helps them integrate what they’ve learned in class into a real conversation. Click here to see more about the course and the course schedule. You can choose from either class time; "S1" or "S2", depending on your timezone. 

NLAN 102: Nepali II

This class is for students with one semester of prior Nepali study who want to expand their linguistic repertoire and develop confidence in speaking. It builds on the skills and vocabulary learned in Nepali I and aims to bring students to the point where they are confident in having simple conversations on their own about a variety of topics, with friends or strangers. Students are introduced to new tenses and structures, learn new vocabulary, and practice using their new words and structures in class via conversations, short presentations, games, and role-playing. Twice a week, students have individual classes with a native Nepali speaker who helps them integrate what they’ve learned in class into a real conversation. Click here to see more about the course and the course schedule. You can choose from either class time; "S1" or "S2", depending on your timezone. 

Sanskrit

SLAN 101: Sanskrit I

This class is for students with no prior study of Sanskrit who want to learn to read texts and who are also curious about the system behind the chanting of Sanskrit verses and the use of Sanskrit as a spoken Language. The class introduces students to the Devanāgarī script and its pronunciation, basic vocabulary, and grammar along with discussion of the historical, cultural, linguistic and religious contexts of the language. Students learn to recognize and understand many common grammatical features of Sanskrit (e.g., case, number and gender of nouns; person, number and tense of verbs; and so on) and gain a basic understanding of how to read Sanskrit. Click here to see more about the course and the course schedule. You can choose from either class time; "S1" or "S2", depending on your timezone. 

SLAN 201: Sanskrit III

This class is for students who have at least two semesters’ study of Sanskrit. The class begins with a review of the grammar covered in the first two semesters and introduces any remaining grammar points so that students are ready to begin to translate texts on their own. They will learn about various resources, both print and electronic, that will to aid their understanding and translation of Sanskrit texts. Discussions of the historical, cultural, linguistic and religious contexts of the language also continue, adding depth to students’ understanding of the language. By the end of the course, students will be able to recognize and understand all of the common grammatical features of the Sanskrit language and will be capable of beginning their own translations of texts. The class introduces texts from a variety of genres, such as poetry, epics, and philosophical discourse, with additional emphasis placed on Sanskrit Buddhist literature. Click here to see more about the course and the course schedule. 

You can choose from S1 or S2 for the grammar class, and you should then also choose a class time for the Traditional portion of the class, "T1" or "T2", which is scheduled independently of the main S1 and S2 classes.

SLAN 301: Sanskrit V

These course focuses on furthering the ability to read classical Sanskrit texts with an emphasis on Buddhist literature. In reading from a spectrum of literary genres such as that found in poetry, dramatic literature, epics, and philosophical discourse, students gain familiarity with the variety of style and grammar used in written Sanskrit. Through in-depth analysis of the grammatical systems employed in this literature, the courses increasingly consolidate the understanding of Sanskrit grammar gained in Sanskrit I-IV.

SLAN 301 (Sanskrit V)  is scheduled on Wed 5:30pm - 7:30pm (Nepal time). There is only one time available for SLAN 301.

 

 

How to Apply!

The difference between taking a course for-credit v.s. not-for-credit is that for the courses taken not-for-credit you will receive a 'NC' grade recorded. The course content is the same. Students taking the class not-for-credit can take quizzes, exams and so forth, but are not required.

If you want to apply for any of the above courses not-for-credit hit the "I don't need credit!" button below. You will be redirected to a page where you will choose the Non-Degree option from the drop-down menu. On this page you will find an application form. Once you have filled out the form click "submit". You will then receive an email with a username and password to log on to the RYI Portal where you can complete your application. In the second part of the application process there is a section called "Statement of Purpose", in this section please specify which course/courses you are interested in, and fill out all other relevant sections of the application form. Once you have filled it out you can then submit the second part of the application form.  RYI will contact you within a few days to let you know if you have been accepted into the program.

Please note that at this point you are applying to our Non-degree program, and in this phase of the application process there won't be an option to choose the course/courses you plan on taking. After you have been accepted into the program RYI will be in contact within a few days to let you know if you have been accepted and to ask you to register for the course/courses you would like to study. It is at this point that you can make your actual course choice through the process of course registration. RYI's application system is set up to accommodate our regular on-campus programs and it is not adapted to all the online options that we are now offering. This is the reason that you will find yourself first applying to a program, and subsequently registering for the course. You can register for any course we offer given you have the necessary pre-requisites. If you would like to apply please click the tab "I don't need credit!"

If you would like to take these courses for credit please hit the tab below to see the options available to you. Here you will be able to check the eligibility requirements of taking the courses for-credit.

 

Admission Criteria

All applications are subject to approval by Rangjung Yeshe Institute.

Eligibility Requirements

Not-for-credit applicants

Not-for-credit applicants are expected to have completed high school (through grade 12) in order to be prepared for university-level study. However, you are not required to submit a high school diploma or transcript.

Non-native English speakers who do not have a Bachelor degree from a university in an English-speaking country will need to submit, as proof of English language proficiency, a letter from an employer or professor attesting to their English competency, or a letter describing your experience with the English language, particularly with respect to understanding spoken lectures. If you wish to take a class with the course code “BSTD” you must also submit the results of an IELTS, TOEFL, or other international standard English Language Proficiency test.

The one exception is for applicants who wish to take only courses taught by our monastic faculty (TSTD classes). In this case, proof of English language proficiency is not required, although applicants must have sufficient English (or Tibetan) to understand the translator (in English) or the lopon or khenpo (in Tibetan).

For-Credit Applicants

Please see eligibility requirements by selecting the "I want credit!" tab in the section "For-Credit" under the heading "How to Apply!" Please note applications are now closed and these pages are not accessible.

Course Fee

Not-for-credit: $620 This is for a 3 credit course, all the above listed courses with the exception of the TSTD courses are 3 credit (this includes an application fee of $50). Six credit courses will cost $1,190 (TSTD courses), any additional courses taken will cost $190 per credit hour. If you continue studying for-credit in the spring semester the $300 KU will be waived.

For-Credit: $1095 (this includes an application fee of $50, $175 RYI registration and Kathmandu University registration fee of $300), any additional courses taken will cost $570. If you continue studying for-credit in the spring semester the $300 KU will be waived.

For Nepali and SAARC students please check the Fee Request tab below.

Fee Request

Nepali and SAARC applicants please check here for the course fees.

Fee Request