Courses

BSTD 706: Methodology Seminar II

The Methodology Seminars are courses on translation method and include discussion of issues such as target language style, audience, translation policy, cultural context, variant meanings, consistency in usage, issues in translation studies and handling translation problems. Also discussed in these courses are the methodological issues involved in translating religious texts in general and Buddhist texts in particular.

BSTD 803: Methodology Seminar III

The Methodology Seminars are courses on translation method and include discussion of issues such as target language style, audience, translation policy, cultural context, variant meanings, consistency in usage, issues in translation studies and handling translation problems. Also discussed in these courses are the methodological issues involved in translating religious texts in general and Buddhist texts in particular.

BSTD 707: Translation Workshop I

This course is a translation workshop where students bring their translations for critique and comment from the faculty member (an experienced translator) and their fellow students. Issues of accuracy, clarity, concision, readability, and suitability are considered and discussed. A suitable text is selected and translated by the entire class.

BSTD 708: Translation Workshop II

This course is a translation workshop where students bring their translations for critique and comment from the faculty member (an experienced translator) and their fellow students. Issues of accuracy, clarity, concision, readability, and suitability are considered and discussed. A suitable text is selected and translated by the entire class.

BSTD 801: Independent Reading

This course involves independent reading in the genre of the text chosen for the thesis to familiarize students with the vocabulary, idioms and conventions of that genre. Students also do secondary reading on such topics as history, philosophy, philology, anthropology, and textual criticism as it relates to their chosen texts. Student are guided in their reading by the Thesis Supervisor and, during bi-weekly meetings, they discuss key points of the texts being read as it relates to translation issues and examine the student’s understanding of the content of the texts.

BSTD 802: Guided Studies

This course is a bi-weekly workshop in which students will exchange translations of the texts they are working on for their thesis and discuss other translations of related material when relevant. By the beginning of the fall semester, students should have draft translations of a significant portion of their thesis texts to share with the class.

BSTD 810: MA Thesis

The thesis will be a translation of a previously untranslated text and should have an appropriate introduction that puts the text and its translation into the appropriate historical, doctrinal, and literary context. By April 30th of the first year of study in the MA program, the student must submit a Thesis Proposal (approx. 1,500 - 1,800 words), developed in collaboration with the Thesis Supervisor, for approval by the Graduate Committee at CBS. In order to proceed to the third semester of study it is a requirement that this committee approves the thesis proposal.

OL TA: The Tibetan Alphabet

This short self-study course guides students through learning the Tibetan alphabet. Upon concluding the seven units successfully, students will have gained visual and auditory familiarity with the 30 “letters” and four “vowels” of Tibetan, be able to spell according to the Tibetan spelling system, and read short sentences in Tibetan.

As this is an entry-level course, there is no prerequisite to study. This course is a prerequisite for RYI’s online Introduction to Classical Tibetan course.

OL TLAN 101: Introduction to Classical Tibetan

Introduction to Classical Tibetan covers the principal topics of classical Tibetan grammar using handbook material as well as text passages from classical Tibetan Buddhist literature. Although the topic of grammar is central, students are also introduced to the basic vocabulary of classical Tibetan philosophy. This course can serve as a springboard for students to begin to delve into Tibetan texts on their own, and as a foundation for more serious students to continue with confidence into more advanced language instruction.

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