Courses

TSTD 401: Advanced Studies in Buddhist Philosophy and Hermeneutics V

This is a series of specialized courses in Buddhist philosophy and scriptural interpretation taught by Khenpos and Lopons and translated into English. The aim of this series is to deepen the knowledge of complex Buddhist philosophical topics and their relations to the broader field of Buddhist studies. Students are able to deepen the understanding developed in Buddhist Philosophy and Hermeneutics I & II and apply more nuanced analyses of the primary source texts studied.

TSTD 402: Advanced Studies in Buddhist Philosophy and Hermeneutics VI

This is a series of specialized courses in Buddhist philosophy and scriptural interpretation taught by Khenpos and Lopons and translated into English. The aim of this series is to deepen the knowledge of complex Buddhist philosophical topics and their relations to the broader field of Buddhist studies. Students are able to deepen the understanding developed in Buddhist Philosophy and Hermeneutics I & II and apply more nuanced analyses of the primary source texts studied.

TSTD 305: Buddhist Philosophical Discourse I

This course develops the students’ ability to listen to and participate in philosophical discussions in a traditional Tibetan format. The course is taught in Tibetan by a Khenpo or Lopon. The objective of the course is for the students to gain proficiency in understanding philosophical ideas as taught in the classical Tibetan idiom, and to answer questions, engage in philosophical discussions, and write exams in that idiom.

TSTD 405: Buddhist Philosophical Discourse III

The aim of this course is to further develop the capacity for philosophical understanding and analysis in Tibetan and gain further familiarity with the articulation of logical reasoning in Tibetan. Building on the abilities acquired in Buddhist Philosophical Discourse I and II, students examine central issues raised in traditional Tibetan Buddhist philosophical studies.

BSTD 203: Fundamentals of Buddhist Philosophy

This course introduces students to the fundamental categories, doctrines and problems of Buddhist philosophy as presented in the early canon, paracanonical literature and the Abhidharma, and to the modern academic study of Buddhist philosophy. Central topics include: the doctrines of not-self, dependent origination, karma and rebirth, ethics, meditation, and dharma theory. The course also emphasizes the further development of skills in reading and assessing primary and secondary sources and writing analytic essays.
 

BSTD 204: Buddhist Scripture

This course examines the role of Buddhist scripture in the development of the Buddhist tradition. Students become familiar with the canonical literature of the three vehicles through reading early suttas and excerpts from Mahāyāna sūtras and Vajrayāna tantras. Additional material such as the avadānas and the dohās may be examined, as well as texts from several commentarial traditions. The role of scripture in the practice of religion is examined, with an eye toward the relationship between texts and ritual practice.

BSTD 207: Buddhist Meditation Practices

This course introduces students to important historical, philosophical, and religious aspects of Buddhist ritual and meditation. Through a theoretical as well as an experiential approach, the rituals and meditations of Buddhist cultures as contained in both original literature and oral traditions are studied. For students to assimilate knowledge of the oral traditions central to Buddhism, active participation in the practical application of meditation and/or rituals is emphasized.

BSTD 208: Methodology of Buddhist Studies

The aim of this course is to develop a critical appreciation of the methodological tools used in the study of Buddhism in modern academic and traditional contexts. Particular emphasis is placed on analyzing the assumptions, claims, and practical implications of different methodologies. This course provides an opportunity for students to critically reflect upon their own education and engage in debates currently shaping the future of the study of Buddhism around the world.

Pages